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Joy of Museums

Museums, Art Galleries and Historical Sites

Museum of Sydney

Museum of Sydney

Museum of Sydney

The Museum of Sydney showcases historical exhibits that illuminate the history of Sydney. The museum explores colonial and contemporary Sydney through objects, pictures and digital media. Sydney’s convict era is explored in a showcase of objects recovered from more than 25 archaeological digs.

Highlights of the Museum of Sydney

Museum of Sydney

  • Museums:      Museum of Sydney
  • Established:   1995
  • Type:               Historical Museum
  • Location:        Corner of Phillip and Bridge Streets, Sydney

Explore Sydney’s Museums

Highlights of the Museum of Sydney

  • “Edge of the Trees” by Janet Laurence and Fiona Foley
    • “Edge of the Trees” is a collaborative public art installation created by artist Janet Laurence and Fiona Foley. The artwork is constructed with 29 vertical pillars made from different materials such as wood, steel, and sandstone collaborating with other organic materials and sound elements. This public art installation evokes the cultural and physical history of the site.
  • Captain Arthur Phillip Memorial
    • This memorial of Captain Arthur Phillip was initially unveiled in 1953 in front of the former Maritime Services building in The Rocks. It was relocated to its current location the site of the First Government House, in 2014 to commemorate the bicentenary of the Arthur Phillip death. Arthur Phillip (1738 – 1814) was a Royal Navy officer and the first Governor of New South Wales who founded the first British penal colony that became the city of Sydney. After a long career in the Royal Navy, Phillip sailed with the First Fleet as Governor-designate of the British penal colony of New South Wales. In January 1788, he selected its location to be Port Jackson in Sydney Harbour.
  • Sydney Boundary Stone 1833
    • This Boundary Stone was engraved “Sydney Majr Genl Rd Bourke CB Governor 1833” and is one of nine Boundary Stones that were set around Sydney in 1833 to mark Sydney’s boundaries. It is not known which position this stone occupied, as it was moved from its original boundary location many years ago.

 

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“Those who lose dreaming are lost.”
– Australian Proverb

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Photo Credit:B JOM

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