Joy of Museums

Museums, Art Galleries & Historical Sites

Pergamon Museum

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Pergamon Museum

The Pergamon Museum is located on the “Museum Island” in Berlin, Germany. The museum is famous for housing large monumental historic Babylonian, Greek and Roman buildings such as the Ishtar Gate of Babylon, the Pergamon Altar and the Market Gate of Miletus. Pergamon Museum has three separate museums: the Collection of Classical Antiquities, the Museum of the Ancient Near East and the Museum of Islamic Art.

The Pergamon Museum was built between 1910 and 1930 and is named after one of its key attractions The Pergamon Altar. It was created to complement the nearby Kaiser-Wilhelm Museum, now the Bode Museum, on what is known as Museum Island. The museum early history was impacted by turbulent periods of war, depression, political upheaval and was damaged in the bombing of Berlin during World War II. Fortunately, many historical pieces were stored away from the museum for their protection, and a number of the museum’s larger pieces were “walled in” for protection.

After the end of World War II, some of the original collection was taken by the Russians as war reparations and displayed or stored at the Hermitage and the Pushkin Museums. Many of the museum’s artefacts were returned in the late 1950s. However, some of the treasures remain in Russia.

The Pergamon Museum is located on the “Museum Island” in the city of Berlin, Germany. Note that over the next few years, the Pergamon Museum and other Museums on Museum Island, Berlin, may be partly closed for significant upgrades to the site and museum buildings as part of a master plan for the entire Unesco World Heritage Site.

Masterpieces of the Pergamon Museum

Pergamon Museum

The Pergamon Exhibit may be closed for a complete remodelling of the exhibit hall, including the installation of a new glass ceiling and a new climate control system. The exhibit is scheduled to reopen in about 2020.

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“Nothing great in the world has ever been accomplished without passion.”
– Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel

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Photo Credit:  User: Pedelecs at wikivoyage shared [CC BY-SA 3.0], via Wikimedia Commons