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Joy of Museums

Museums, Art Galleries and Historical Sites

Exhibits of the Charles Dickens Museum

Charles Dickens Museum

Highlights of the Charles Dickens Museum

The Charles Dickens Museum is the author’s house turned to into a museum about Charles Dickens. The museum is housed in a Georgian terraced house which was Charles Dickens’s home from 1837 to 1839. Charles Dickens and his wife Catherine Dickens lived here and the older two of Dickens’s daughters, Mary Dickens and Kate were born in this house.

Highlights of the Charles Dickens Museum

  • Charles Dickens Blue Plaque
    • This Blue Plaque is on the building located at 48 Doughty Street in Holborn, London. Which is also the location of the Charles Dickens Museum. The museum is housed in a Georgian terraced house which was Charles Dickens’s home from 1837 to 1839. Charles Dickens and his wife Catherine Dickens lived here and the older two of Dickens’s daughters, Mary Dickens and Kate were born in this house. A blue plaque is a historical marker in the United Kingdom to commemorate a link between that location and a famous person or event. The “official” scheme is administered by English Heritage and traces its origins to 1866 in London, on the initiative of the politician, to mark the homes and workplaces of famous people. The first such scheme in the world, it has provided the inspiration and model for many others across the globe.
  • Charles Dickens Dining Room
    • The Dining Room is located on the ground floor of Charles Dicken home. It’s an ideal position in the house, and the grand architecture of the house was ideal for launching Dickens socially. This elegant room played a vital role as the rising authour enjoyed his first flush of success. Dickens entertained many leading and influential Victorian figures in this room.
  • Charles Dickens Morning Room
    • Catherine Dickens used this room to manage domestic and household matters. Mrs Dickens spent time with her children, wrote letters and welcomed visitors to this room. Dickens spent much of his time travelling away from home, and they kept in touch with regular written correspondence. Many of their surviving letters demonstrate that their time in this house was a particularly happy time for for the Dickens couple.
  • Charles Dickens Kitchen
    • The Kitchen is located on the basement level, and this is where the servants prepared the family meals. The kitchen was managed by the mistress of the house, Catherine Dickens, as traders and merchants came in and out with food supplies. Victorian kitchens of the time were low-lit and filled with heat and smoke from the cooking fires. In 1836, after a one-year engagement, Dickens married Catherine Thomson Hogarth (1816–1879). The family set up home in Bloomsbury in this house, on which Dickens had a three-year lease at £80 a year, from 1837 – 1839. This was a happy period for the Dickens couple with two of their children born in this house.
  • Charles Dickens Washhouse
    • The washroom was used by the maids to wash and iron clothes for the household. This is a typical Victorian-era washhouse. Dickens’s portrayal of servants was more sympathetic than most of his peers, and his views endeared him to the domestic staff around England at the time. In 1836, after a one-year engagement, Dickens married Catherine Thomson Hogarth (1816–1879), the daughter of George Hogarth, editor of the Evening Chronicle. The family set up home in Bloomsbury in this house, on which Dickens had a three-year lease at £80 a year, from 1837 – 1839.

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“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”
– Charles Dickens

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Photo Credit: JOM

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