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Padiiset’s Statue

Egyptian - Statue of a Vizier, Usurped by Pa-di-iset - Walters 22203

Padiiset’s Statue

Padiiset’s Statue is a basalt statue found in the Egyptian delta which includes an inscription referring to trade between Canaan and Ancient Egypt. It is the last known Ancient Egyptian reference to Canaan. The statue was created in the 1780-1700 BC period to commemorate a government vizier. A millennium later the original inscription was erased and replaced with inscriptions on the front and back.

It is an example of the re-use of a work of art, reflecting Egypt’s long history. This statue was originally carved to commemorate a powerful government official., then a thousand years later the inscription naming this forgotten man was erased, and new carved was added to commemorate its new owner. From a text on the rear of the statue, we learn that Pa-di-iset was a diplomatic messenger to the neighbouring lands of Canaan and Peleset or Palestine.

Egyptian - Statue of a Vizier, Usurped by Pa-di-iset - Walters 22203 - Back

The rear view of Padiiset’s Statue

Padiiset’s Statue

  • Title:                    Padiiset’s Statue or Pateese’s Statue
  • Date:                    1780-1700 BC (Inscription: 900-850 BC)
  • Culture:               Egyptian
  • Findsite:              Egypt, Delta
  • Found:                 1894
  • Writing:              Egyptian hieroglyphs
  • Material:             Basalt; graywacke
  • Dimensions:       12 x 4 1/16 x 4 1/2 in. (30.5 x 10.25 x 11.5 cm)
  • Museum:            Walters Art Museum

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“Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.”Napoleon Bonaparte

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Photo Credit: 1) Walters Art Museum [Public domain, CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons 2) Walters Art Museum [Public domain, CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons