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Joy of Museums

Museums, Art Galleries and Historical Sites

Masterpieces of the Getty Museum

Masterpieces of the Getty Museum

Masterpieces of the Getty Museum

In 1974, J. Paul Getty opened a museum in Malibu, California, by 1982, the museum became the richest in the world when it inherited US$1.2 billion. In 1997, the museum moved to its current location in the Brentwood neighbourhood of Los Angeles; the Malibu museum renamed the “Getty Villa”, was renovated and reopened in 2006.

Masterpieces of the Getty Museum

  • “The Grand Canal in Venice from Palazzo Flangini to Campo San Marcuola” by Canaletto
    • “The Grand Canal in Venice from Palazzo Flangini to Campo San Marcuola” by Canaletto was painted in 1738. This composition is called a veduta (Italian for “view”) meaning a highly detailed, usually large-scale painting of a cityscape or some other vista. This vendute painting depicts the upper reaches of the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy, near the entrance to the Cannaregio Canal. Venduta paintings were popular with the wealthy tourists to Venice in the mid-1700s.
  • Modern Rome – Campo Vaccino” by J.M.W. Turner
    • “Modern Rome – Campo Vaccino” by J.M.W. Turner is a landscape vision of the unexcavated Roman Forum, still called the Campo Vaccino meaning “Cow Pasture”, shimmering in the hazy light. Ten years after his final journey to Rome, Turner envisioned Rome from his memory. With churches and ancient monuments in and around the Roman Forum dissolving in bright colours as the light from the moon is rising on the left and the sun is setting behind the Capitoline Hill at the right.
  •  “Irises” by Vincent van Gogh“Irises” by Vincent van Gogh
    • “Irises” is one of several paintings of ‘Irises’ by Vincent van Gogh and one of a series of paintings he painted at the asylum in Saint-Rémy, France, in the last year before his death. In 1889 after several episodes of self-mutilation and hospitalisation, Van Gogh chose to enter an asylum. There, in the last year before his death, he created over 120 paintings. Shortly after entering the asylum, Van Gogh started Irises, working from nature in the asylum’s garden. He called painting “the lightning conductor for my illness” because he felt that he could keep himself from going insane by continuing to paint.
  • “After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Back” by Edgar Degas
    • “After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Back” by Edgar Degas is a print of a female bather kneeling on a chair covered with towels as she arches her back over the backrest of the chair as if to pick something up with her right hand. This print is part of a series of photographs, prints, drawings, preliminary sketches in pastels and oils by Degas from this period that depicts women during the bathing process. Degas often used sketches and photography as a preliminary step to study the light and the composition for his paintings. This work is part of a series which depict women, as in this example, in awkward and unnatural positions. Degas, said, he intended to create a feeling in the viewer “as if you looked through a keyhole.”
  • “Wheatstacks, Snow Effect, Morning” by Claude Monet
    • “Wheatstacks, Snow Effect, Morning” by Claude Monet is part of a series of stacks of harvested wheat. The series consists of twenty-five canvas which Monet began near the end of the summer of 1890 and though Monet also produced earlier paintings using this same stack subject. The impressionist series is famous for how Monet repeated the same theme to show the different light and atmosphere at different times of day, across the seasons and in many types of weather. Monet’s Haystacks series is one of his earliest to rely on repetition of a subject to illustrate a subtle difference in colour perception across variations of times of day, seasons, and weather.
  • Portrait of a Halberdier by Pontormo
    • “Portrait of a Halberdier” by Pontormo depicts a young man standing before a fortress wall, holding a halberd. A halberd is a two-handed pole weapon that came to prominent use during the 14th and 15th centuries and troops that used the weapon were called halberdiers. The identity of the person is not certain; however Florentine records noted that during the siege of Florence in 1528, the artist, Pontormo painted a portrait of a young nobleman called Francesco Guardi as a soldier.
  • Spring by Édouard Manet
  • Danaë by Orazio Gentileschi
  • Getty Kouros
  • Victorious Youth
  • ” Virgin with Child, St. John the Baptist, and Mary Magdalene” by Parmigianino
  • “Portrait of Alfonso d’Avalos, Marchese del Vasto” by Titian
  • “The Entombment” by Peter Paul Rubens
  • “Rembrandt Laughing” by Rembrandt
  • “An Old Man in Military Costume” by Rembrandt
  • “The Abduction of Europa” by Rembrandt

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“Tell me and I forget. Teach me and I remember. Involve me and I learn.”
– Benjamin Franklin

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Photo Credit: By Remi Mathis (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

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