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“Luncheon of the Boating Party” by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir - Luncheon of the Boating Party - Google Art Project

“Luncheon of the Boating Party” by Pierre-Auguste Renoir

“Luncheon of the Boating Party” by Pierre-Auguste Renoir depicts a group of Renoir’s friends relaxing on a balcony at a restaurant along the Seine river in Chatou, France. All of the figures in the painting have been identified and their names are known. Renoir’s future wife, Aline Charigot, is in the foreground playing with a small dog.

The diagonal of the railing serves to demarcates the two halves of the composition, one full of figures, the other showing the landscape except for the two figures which are made prominent by this contrast. In this painting, Renoir has skillfully captured flickering light with a fluidity of brush stroke.

At the Seventh Impressionist Exhibition in 1882, the painting well received by the critics. Including the following quote:

“…one of the best things [Renoir] has painted…There are bits of drawing that are completely remarkable, drawing- true drawing- that is a result of the juxtaposition of hues and not of line. It is one of the most beautiful pieces that this insurrectionist art by Independent artists has produced.”

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, commonly known as Auguste Renoir was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. As a celebrator of beauty and especially feminine sensuality. He was a prolific artist, having created several thousand paintings.

Luncheon of the Boating Party:

  • Title:                Luncheon of the Boating Party
  • Français:         Le déjeuner des canotiers
  • Artist:               Pierre-Auguste Renoir
  • Date:                1881
  • Style:                Impressionism
  • Medium:          Oil on canvas
  • Dimensions:    Height: 1,302 mm (51.26 in). Width: 1,756 mm (69.13 in).
  • Museum:          The Phillips Collection

Pierre-Auguste Renoir:


“The pain passes but the beauty remains.” Pierre-Auguste Renoir


Photo Credit 1) Pierre-Auguste Renoir [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons